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  #1  
Old 01-12-2013, 02:27 PM
FRDesign FRDesign is offline
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Default Anyone else agree Car Design isn't going the right direction?

Hey everyone, It appears to me that the current trend of car design is, get a plain or boring design and add ugly traits eveywhere to it. Nothing is simple and clean anymore, just a mess of lines, and too much complexity.

For Example, the 2014 Sierra, The headlights have way too much going on, theres random chunks of bulgyness everywhere and the whole thing looks like its trying too hard to be tough.


Another Example, the New BMW F30 3-Series. The headlight design and everything is just too much going on.
It just doesnt look good when you look at it beside an older E46 (in my opinion one of the best designed cars of all time)
A Classic, yet simple but not boring design.

And last but not least. The New Lexus IS. The old model was a great looking car, not too crazy looking, but it was classy, sporty and didnt offend anyone. The new one tries so hard to not be boring that it looks silly.

Compared to the old one, which was looking a little bit dated, but, imo lexus over did it.


All the car manufacturers need to stop going crazy with these radical designs, stupid LED lighting everywhere, which looks cheap and tacky, and stop trying to make cars look not so boring. Anyone agree?
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  #2  
Old 01-12-2013, 05:00 PM
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swizzle swizzle is offline
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I disagree with the global statement, but agree individually. Some brands are trying too hard to create an instant identity like Lexus with the sudden arrival of the spindle. When Audi when to the open hole look, it was at least presaged by the preceding face. Chevy's chrome bar nose was a terrible example of trying to force a style, but the fact that they haven't redone the facia of their cars more rapidly to the new look is ridiculous. Mercedes needs to turn its styling over to someone because they are overstyling so as to be sure they have style.

Chevrolet: Chevy is very hit and miss in its styling. The Malibu is ghastly in person, the Cruze tasteful but bland and there is no consistency. Even with the new face being a massive improvement over the chrome bar, it is unfortunately style free

Ford: Dead on! The only stumble will be if the new Mustang comes out looking like a Fusion coupe (Evos)

Cadillac: Dead on and creating modern classics

Lincoln: utterly wrong direction of HUGE grilles that glare at you

Dodge/Chrysler: Design is all over the place. Retro with the Challenger, truck-faced with retro-inspired touches on the Charger, nicely done with the Dart, 300 is sublime, but overall the dismal Mercedes-era garbage is in the way.

VW Group: generally in the right direction with the exception of the yet again dowdy Golf, and the caricature parade at Porsche

Ferrari: The uterus ass why???

Maserati: new Qporte is tasteful but Genesis bland

Honda/Acura: flailing wildly

Hyundai/Kia: on a huge roll but how to sustain it

Toyota: style free as always
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Old 01-12-2013, 08:53 PM
FRDesign FRDesign is offline
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I agree with you on some points, some brands arent exactly what i said. VW and Audi in my opinion are looking great. Lincoln is a mess right now, and I don't know what they are doing. Mercedes has gone from Classy to, a little bit too flashy and overstyled (although, I LOVE the SLS, and all amg models)
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Old 01-12-2013, 10:37 PM
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Nastka Nastka is offline
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It seems like most companies desperately try to create a distinctive brand identity using cues they never used before in their history, so much so that it is being shoved into our faces in a not-so-subtle manner. The Lexus spindle is a perfect example of this. BMW focused on their grill and has increased it's size and prominence drastically (I personally associated BMW more with their round headlights which they dropped, but whatever), but at least that was a feature that was already there.

Also; LEDs. Audi pioneered their use and are currently the only mainstream manufacturer that has gotten it right. Period. You can identify a pair of Audi head- and taillights pretty much with a 99% success rate from afar, whilst everybody else is busy tacking them on as an afterthought. I'm scared what will happen once they get the ball rolling with OLED lighting as previewed by that concept not long ago (the name escapes me ATM.). We'll have rolling Christmas trees soon enough!

My prediction is as following: less subtlety, more branding, more bling, more vulgarity. One of the reasons might be that everyone is trying to expand into new markets and to cater to different tastes, another is that consumers are a little bit like cockroaches: we get used to advertising and branding quicker than those little buggers to pesticide.
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Old 01-13-2013, 04:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nastka View Post
...
My prediction is as following: less subtlety, more branding, more bling, more vulgarity. One of the reasons might be that everyone is trying to expand into new markets and to cater to different tastes, another is that consumers are a little bit like cockroaches: we get used to advertising and branding quicker than those little buggers to pesticide.
Sadly, I agree with your assessment.
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Old 01-14-2013, 12:36 PM
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I think Bangle kick started this trend with his 'flame surfacing'. While I liked the Bangle BMWs, they only looked good because they were so different to anything else out there at the time. Now we've got flame surfaced Mercedeseses, Hyundais, Nissans, Hondas, Renaults, Maseratis... And so on.
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  #7  
Old 01-15-2013, 01:40 AM
63Bonneville 63Bonneville is offline
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If anything, today's products are far more substantial, robust, integrated, expressive, and sexier, as well as being more desirable, especially to be seen in, than if you compare what was offered decades back. Of you look at today, compared to products of the 1980s, and even the 1990s, be it NA Europe and Asia, there's a tremendous difference.

In the 80s, all was boxier, and flatter/blander/slab-sided and less-attractive proportions with smaller wheels and taller greenhouses/DLO with thinner pillars which overall appeared chintzier as well as bland and boring. The 1990s started to get more shape, but, eventually became more generic and ovid, and less of an identity. This all seemed to follow Ford's "jellybean" school of design started in the 1980s (Thunderbird, Taurus/Sable), which was cutting-edge for the time, and the industry followed suit into the 1990s. Also, the vehicles of those eras were significantly smaller in most dimensions than today's counterparts, where they appear cheaper, less substantial, and have far less curbside appeal.

Of course, during those decades, some tried to eliminate the front grill in the name of aerodynamics. A knowledgeable source had told me that technically, a grill isn't really needed, for the air-intake to the engine can come in from below. But, I feel, in the name of identity and giving the car a face, as well as some bling, these elements remain.

If anything can disappoint, it's a chintzy, plasticky, Fisher-Price or Tupperware like interior, likely in the name of cost-cutting. Especially where hard plastics are more involved instead of higher-end, soft-touch.
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Last edited by 63Bonneville; 01-15-2013 at 02:59 AM.
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